BOOK PROJECTS

My research looks directly at the productions of difference in the literatures of the African diaspora to devise new frameworks of analysis for liminality within the experiences of travel, displacement, and exile. I focus my research along several threads: resistance strategies marginalized groups deploy to counter heterosexist, masculinist, and racist hegemonic discourses, and the ways in which race, class, gender, and sex are used to control the subjectivity and agency of "the Other" and to delineate those bodies as transgressive.

Global Innovation of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Transgressing Boundaries (London: Springer Press, 2014)
 

This book links approaches to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning across various cultural, institutional, and disciplinary contexts. It answers the question of how course format, delivery, and duration affect teaching and learning, and showcases innovative pedagogical approaches for engaging student learners in varied settings. The contributors to this collection work in the United States, the United Kingdom, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. They bring a wealth of experience and represent a broad range of disciplines and fields. They teach in diverse contexts, delivery modes, and formats, including online, study abroad, blended courses/modules, accelerated, condense, intensive and “traditional” semesters, and their higher education students are equally as diverse, spanning adolescence to adulthood. This book harnesses the rich, intellectual, cultural, and institutional diversity and range our contributors represent and shares the results of their new and previously unpublished studies and work.

 

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Travel Short & Learn Long: Maximizing the Impact of Short Term Study Abroad
 

This book links approaches to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning across various cultural, institutional, and disciplinary contexts. It answers the question of how course format, delivery, and duration affect teaching and learning, and showcases innovative pedagogical approaches for engaging student learners in varied settings. The contributors to this collection work in the United States, the United Kingdom, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. They bring a wealth of experience and represent a broad range of disciplines and fields. They teach in diverse contexts, delivery modes, and formats, including online, study abroad, blended courses/modules, accelerated, condense, intensive and “traditional” semesters, and their higher education students are equally as diverse, spanning adolescence to adulthood. This book harnesses the rich, intellectual, cultural, and institutional diversity and range our contributors represent and shares the results of their new and previously unpublished studies and work.

 

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Protest Art & Political Struggle: Profiles in Courage and Anti-Apartheid Entrepreneurship

 

This book connects biography, artistry, advocacy and industry, of some of South Africa's interesting entrepreneurs.  Taken together, these portraits reflect the politics of a nation, the struggles to overcome them, and the use of the arts, broadly defined, to protest and triumph over adversity.

 

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Steel Ovaries

 

This book links the economic and reproductive exigencies of nationhood to Caribbean women’s realities. It contends that the strategies of a select but representative body of autobiographical and fictional texts by various Caribbean women writers—Mary Seacole, Patricia Powell, Michelle Cliff, Elizabeth Nunez and Shani Mootoo—reflect the ways in which women engage the economic enterprises of the nation-state as strategies of resistance.  It examines women’s entrepreneurship, particularly their materialistic and commercial ambitions as tools for escaping oppression and violence, as avenues for establishing networks among themselves and for engaging traditional male domains. Economic forces, this book contends, intermingle and influence the movement and the decisions that Caribbean women make, even from the margins of the nation-state, in their experiences of displacement, travel, and exile. It advances womanist discourse beyond the realm of racial identity politics to vital economic agency.

 

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